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JUMP TEST
(Model: BIO-JTET)
The "jump to escape" test is an entirely new set-up for the evaluation of the escaping behaviour of mice experimenting a ramp of cold and hot temperatures over an aluminium plate: it allows you to differentiate thermal allodynia from hyperalgesia in models of peripheral pain sensitization for mice. A must for your research on analgesia, especially to measure pharmacological effects of cancer treatment, including chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.

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! NEW RESEARCH WORK ! A recent publication by J. Descoeur, V. Pereira, A. Pizzoccaro, A. Francois, B. Ling et al. (Team of Dr Bourinet) in "EMBO Molecular Medicine" highlights the merits of using Bioseb's Jump Test: Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.

Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.
J. Descoeur, V. Pereira, A. Pizzoccaro, A. Francois, B. Ling et al. (Team of Dr Bourinet)
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS, UMR-5203, Département de Physiologie, Montpellier, France.
Published in "EMBO Molecular Medicine" (2011-05-24)


Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.
Presentation

Following the publications of I. Yalcin et al. (The Journal of Pain, 2009) and complementary works from team of Dr Bourinet (EMBO J.Descoeur et al, 2011) regarding hypersensitivity to cold stimulus, BIOSEB has developed an entirely new set-up for the evaluation of the escaping behaviour of mice experimenting a ramp of temperature (cold and hot) over an aluminium plate.

The entire instrument is based on our popular Hot and cold Plate hardware, built around a metal plate which can be heated to 65°C and cooled to -3°C (with an ambient temperature between 20°C and 25°C), which already opened new investigation fields for your analgesia and nociception research. The classical setting is completed with a special back lighting plate and a HD camera sensitive to the back light wavelength placed in front of the Hot and Cold Plate.

A dedicated software controls the whole test and allows you to:
• Program and control the ramp of temperature
• Collect/record/compress the video
• Detect the jumps of the mouse within its cage and in total darkness
• Display graphic of jump over time and jumps over range of temperature

The test has been mostly used to measure pharmacological effects of cancer treatment to cold sensitivity on mice.

Operating principle

A ramp is generally programmed from 30°C to 1 °C and the distribution of jump recorded over the whole experiment. Metrology wise, the Jump Test is accurate to less than 0,5°C (EEC metrology standard) and perfectly constant in the animal holder system.

The JUMP TEST is an automatic analgesia apparatus which frees time to the experimenter to perform other works on bench. It secures the counting, and stores video as a backup if additional evaluation is needed later.

JTET Software for the Jump Test -  Evaluation of the escaping behaviour of mice after hot and cold stimulus
JTET Software for the Jump Test
Features

• Fully automatic
• Operator-independant
• Works in total darkness
• Owner of HCP eligible for update
• Evolutive hardware (T2CT Gradient Test)
• Principle validated and published

Parameters

• Jumps counting
• Distribution of jumps/time
• Distribution of jumps vs/°C

Domains of application

• Differentiate thermal allodynia from hyperalgesia models
• Study peripheral pain sensitization for mice in a single paradigm
• Measure pharmacological effects of cancer treatment on mice's sensitivity to cold
• Measure efficacy of analgesics
• Studies on thermal nociception in mouse models: allodynia, hyperalgesia of inflammatory pain models, capsaicin-induced inflammation, effects of carrageenins
• Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy: application on animals exposed to oxalyplatin and developing hypersensitivity to cold
• Studies on morphine and naloxone dependence

Supplied with

• Hot cold plate and its cage
• Lighting and special camera
• Tripod
• JTET software, cables and instruction manual


Publications (Click on an article to show details and read the abstract)

PAIN
- Neuropathic pain -
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors. (2011)
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.
J. Descoeur, V. Pereira, A. Pizzoccaro, A. Francois, B. Ling et al. (Team of Dr Bourinet)
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS, UMR-5203, Département de Physiologie, Montpellier, France.
Published in "EMBO Molecular Medicine" (2011-05-24)

Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

SENSORY SYSTEM
- Hot & Cold Perception -
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors. (2011)
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.
J. Descoeur, V. Pereira, A. Pizzoccaro, A. Francois, B. Ling et al. (Team of Dr Bourinet)
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS, UMR-5203, Département de Physiologie, Montpellier, France.
Published in "EMBO Molecular Medicine" (2011-05-24)

Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

Differentiating Thermal Allodynia and Hyperalgesia Using Dynamic Hot and Cold Plate in Rodents. (2009)
Differentiating Thermal Allodynia and Hyperalgesia Using Dynamic Hot and Cold Plate in Rodents.
I. Yalcin, A. Charlet, M.-J. Freund-Mercier, M. Barrot, P. Poisbeau.
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, Nociception and Pain Department, Strasbourg, France.
Published in "The Journal of Pain" (2009-07-30)

In animal studies, thermal sensitivity is mostly evaluated on the basis of nociceptive reaction latencies in response to a given thermal aversive stimulus. However, these techniques may be inappropriate to differentiate allodynia from hyperalgesia or to provide information differentiating the activation of nociceptor subtypes. The recent development of dynamic hot and cold plates, allowing computer-controlled ramps of temperature, may be useful for such measures. In this study, we characterized their interest for studying thermal nociception in freely moving mice and rats. We showed that escape behavior (jumps) was the most appropriate parameter in C57Bl/6J mice, whereas nociceptive response was estimated by using the sum of paw lickings and withdrawals in Sprague-Dawley rats. We then demonstrated that this procedure allows the detection of both thermal allodynia and hyperalgesia after peripheral pain sensitization with capsaicin in mice and in rats. In a condition of carrageenan-induced paw inflammation, we observed the previously described thermal hyperalgesia, but we also revealed that rats exhibit a clear thermal allodynia to a cold or a hot stimulus. These results demonstrate the interest of the dynamic hot and cold plate to study thermal nociception, and more particularly to study both thermal allodynia and hyperalgesia within a single paradigm in awake and freely moving rodents. Perspective: Despite its clinical relevance, thermal allodynia is rarely studied by researchers working on animal models. As shown after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive fibers or during inflammatory pain, the dynamic hot and cold plate validated in the present study provides a useful tool to distinguish between thermal allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rodents.

CROSS-DISCIPLINARY SUBJECTS
- Cancer -
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors. (2011)
Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.
J. Descoeur, V. Pereira, A. Pizzoccaro, A. Francois, B. Ling et al. (Team of Dr Bourinet)
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS, UMR-5203, Département de Physiologie, Montpellier, France.
Published in "EMBO Molecular Medicine" (2011-05-24)

Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.


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Temp range -3°C to 65°C
Temp accuracy +- 0,5°C
Uniformity +- 0,5°C
Power supply 110/220V, 100 W
Plate dimensions 165x165 mm
Overall dimensions 305x280x158 mm
Weight 10 Kg
Detection B&W HD camera and special lighting setup
PC requirement 2 USB ports, OS Windows 8, 7, 3Go RAM, Core I3 mini

Model:
BIO-JTET
Jump Test
Contact us

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Cold Hot Plate Test
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Lanes - Mice: 2 / Rats: 1 Contact us
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