Site Metrics and Web Analytics by WebSTAT
Home > Catalog > Activity, motor control & coordination
Product
Category
GRIP STRENGTH TEST
(Model: BIO-GS3)
An easy way to objectively quantify the muscular strength of rodents (mouse and rat), and to assess the effect of drugs, toxins, muscular (i.e. myopathy) and neurodegenerative diseases on muscular degeneration. Widely used in conjunction with the ROTAROD motor coordination test, since a normally coordinated rodent will show a low score if its muscular strength is low, the Grip Strength Test for rats and mice is a must for your research on activity, motor control & coordination, and is particularly well suited for studies on Parkinson’s & Huntington’s disease.

- More information - - Documents - - Contact Bioseb -
Users
Publications
Technical specifications
Other products / accessory  
  • HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL Charlestown, USA
  • NIH Rockville, USA
  • MOREHOUSE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Atlanta, USA
  • UCSF-GALL0 CENTER Emeryville, USA
  • UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Tampa Frorida, USA
  • UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA Georgia, USA
  • CORIMMUN GMBH Martinsried, Germany
  • TAKEDA CAMBRIDGE Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Baltimore, USA
  • UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURY Missoury, USA
  • ABBOTT GMBH & KO Ludwigshafen, Germany
  • WELLCOME TRUST SANGER INSTITUTE Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • ADDEX PHARMACEUTICALS Archamps, France
  • HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN Munich, Germany
  • BIOCODEX Compiegne, France
  • UPRES Marseille, France
  • MDS PHARMA St Germain sur L'Arbresle, France
  • ECOLE VETERINAIRE ALFORT Maison Arfor, France
  • GUERICKE UNIVERSITY Magdeburg, Germany
  • FACULTE DE MEDECINE Namur, Belgium
  • LAB RESEARCH Veszprem, Hungary
  • NEURAXO BIOPHARMACEUTICALS Dusseldorf, Germany
  • INSERM Grenoble, France
  • HARWELL SCIENCE AND INNOVATION Didcot, United Kingdom
  • NOVARTIS Basel, Switzerland
  • LAB DE NEUROPHYSIOLOGY Bruxelles, Belgium
  • IGBMC Strasbourg, France
  • ICS Strasbourg, France
  • COLLEGE DE France Paris, France
  • PHARMACOLGIE Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • MDS L’ARBRESLE
  • UNIVERSITE LOUIS PASTEUR Strasbourg, France
  • IPSEN BEAUFOUR Les Ulis,France
  • GENEVA UNIVERSITY PHARMACOLOGY Geneva, Switzerland
  • ERAMUS UNIVESITY ROTTERDAM Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • INSERM Paris, France
  • JAGIELLOXIAN UNIVERSITY Kralow, Poland
  • INSERM Nantes, France
  • TROPHOS Marseille, France
  • BAYER CROP SCIENCE Nice, France
  • CNRS Paris, Strasbourg, Nantes, Orleans, Clermont-Ferrand, Orsay, Yvette & Marseille, France
  • FAUST PHARMACEUTICALS Illkrich, France
  • PIERRE FABRE Castres & Tours, France
  • EMBL Monterodondo, Italy
  • GLAXO SK UK Ware, United Kingdom
  • PARADIGM Pharmaceutical Singapore
  • EPFL Lausanne, Switzerland
  • NOVARTIS Basel, Switzerland
  • NEUROFIT Illkrich, Switzerland
  • SANOFI Vitry, Toulouse & Montpellier, France
  • SERVIER Croissy sur Seine, France
See tutorial
Download PDF
Request video

This page is available in following languages:
! NEW RESEARCH WORK ! A recent publication by A NIEWIADOMSKA-CIMICKA, F Doussau, JB Perot et al in "Molecular Neurodegeneration" highlights the merits of using Bioseb's Grip strength test: SCA7 mice recapitulate CNS, PNS and retina pathologies and show a transcriptional signature of Purkinje cell dysfunction prevailing in SCA1 and SCA2 mice.

SCA7 mice recapitulate CNS, PNS and retina pathologies and show a transcriptional signature of Purkinje cell dysfunction prevailing in SCA1 and SCA2 mice.
A NIEWIADOMSKA-CIMICKA, F Doussau, JB Perot et al
Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire
Published in "Molecular Neurodegeneration" (2020-05-01)


Here we describe the first SCA7 knock-in mice that combine most cardinal features of SCA7, including retinal, cerebellar, cerebral and peripheral nerves pathologies, which account for progressive impairment of behavior, motor and vision functions. MRI and brain morphometry reveal atrophy of grey and white matter of specific cerebral regions, while peripheral nerves and photoreceptors show functional and morphological alterations. We show that cerebellar pathology is characterized by gene deregulation in all cerebellar cell types and alterations of SAGA-dependent epigenetic marks. Intranuclear accumulation of mutant ATXN7 and gene downregulation precede the onset of PC pacemaker dysfunction. Interestingly, PC show loss of expression of 83 PC-specific genes coding for ion channels, receptors and signaling proteins involved in pacemaker function and long-term depression, which are causal factors of many type of ataxias. Comparison of cerebellar transcriptome with other SCAs reveals a subset of 67 PC-specific genes downregulated in SCA1, SCA2 and SCA7, providing a common signature of early PC dysfunction.

Bioseb Grip Test for Rodents (rats and mice): close-up

Grip Test: Mouse on the grid
Presentation

BIOSEB's Grip Strength Test allows the study of neuromuscular functions by determining the maximal peak force developed by a rodent (rat or mouse) when the operator tries to pull it out of a specially designed grid or bar, which are available for both fore and hind limbs. The Grip Test has been documented in numerous literature, and is included in the Functional Observational Battery (FOB) to screen for neurobehavioral toxicity. In this context, changes in grip strength peak values of rodents (rats or mice) are interpreted as evidence of motor neurotoxicity.

This force assessment is widely used in conjunction with the ROTAROD motor coordination test, since a normally coordinated rodent will show a low score if its muscular strength is low.

The current Grip Strength Test apparatus is the third version based on Bioseb's methodology. The first version was developed in 1999, and Bioseb's Grip Strength Test now counts hundreds of users around the world !

You can click on following links to visit the webpage of researchers using our instrument for their work on CNS (Central Nervous System) disorders, neuromuscular investigation and drug assessment:
Bioseb's Grip Test Page of the Institut Clinique de la Souris (ICS), Strasbourg, France
Bioseb's Grip Test Page of the MRC Harwell Internation Center for Mouse Genetics, Oxford, United Kingdom
Grip Test Protocol by the European Mouse Phenotyping Resource of Standardised Screens (PDF file)

Operating principle

Bioseb’s Grip Strength Test for mice and rats is simple to operate : the grip strength meter is positioned horizontally and the subjects are held by the tail and lowered towards the apparatus. The animals (rat or mouse) are allowed to grab the metal grid or triangular pull bar and are then pulled backwards in the horizontal plane. The force applied to the grid or to the bar just before it loses grip is recorded as the peak tension.

The measurement is accomplished using a highly accurate sensor (same sensor for rats and mice) and an electronic device offering a sampling rate of 1000 Hz. This ensures that the maximum force is perfectly captured and displayed, even for short and low force peaks - this is especially useful when grip testing mice.

Measurements can be recorded and displayed in grams, newtons, or lbs. The unit is directly selected on the keyboard. Data output is available through a RS232 port, a printer, or a graphic recorder. Individual measurements (up to 100) are stored in an internal memory, and can be downloaded after the experiment.
Grip Strength Test: Grids for Rat & Mouse, Bars for Rat & Mouse
Grids for Rat & Mouse, Bars for Mouse & Rat


Key features

The new Bioseb GRIP TEST Version 3+ offers unique features:

A single instrument for mice and rats, which may be used as a stand alone tool or connected to a printer or a PC
Accessories to measure from the front paws, back paws, or the 4 paws, in a mesh grid or in a bar version (see opposite illustration)
Easy to operate and calibrate:
1. Hold the animal by the tail or the neck's skin.
2. Move the animal down until it grasps the grid/bar.
3. Pull the animal along the sensor axle until grip is released.


An embedded statistical computation has been included in the electronic device. This is a very useful feature that as been very well received and used by users of large numbers of tests. The display shows in real time the mean, standard deviation and variation coefficient from groups of animals. This feature allows also to cancel any grip strength test not correctly performed.

The optional Bioseb’s Bio-CIS software sends datas acquired via the Grip Test into a MS Excel sheet using the RS232 port. Easy to set up, this soft interface uses the full power of MS EXCEL functions, to let you create statistical tables and graphics.

Bioseb Grip Strength Test for mice and rats: Screenshot showing statistical computations and peak force
Grip Test: Screenshots
Embedded statistics module : a new development by Bioseb allows direct reading of the average value, standard deviation and variability for several subjects groups and up to 100 animals. This feature allows also to cancel any grip strength test not correctly performed.
Very fast sampling rate of 1000Hz, to secure the repeatability in the “peak” force capture and measurement
Highly reliable sensors, 0.1% of full scale and a fine resolution (resolution is user-settable as low as 0,1g)
Internal memory for measured data, up to 100 values can be stored manually, to be edited or downloaded later
• Data is stored in memory as a table with time/measured force
• Built-in RS 232 port allowing transfer of data to a PC or a printer
Optional Bioseb Bio-CIS Software allowing user to send measured values directly into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet


Supplied with

1 stand and counter weight, 1 grip accessory (to be chosen among the available models described above), power supply adaptor (100-240 V), user manual and tutorial.

Special model upon request

Higher capacity (marmoset), double sensor, Meyer's method (double gauge, front to front). Please enquire


Domains of application

• Neuromuscular diseases
• Phenotyping
• Drug screening
• Parkinson disease
• Huntington disease
• Aging

Publications (Click on an article to show details and read the abstract)

PAIN
- General pain -
Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury (2018)
Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury
J. Ross, L.F. Queme, J.E. Lamb, K.J. Green, M.P. Jankowski
Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA
Published in "Biology of Sex Differences" (2018-01-03)

Background
Chronic pain conditions are more prevalent in women, but most preclinical studies into mechanisms of pain generation are performed using male animals. Furthermore, whereas group III and IV nociceptive muscle afferents provoke central sensitization more effectively than their cutaneous counterparts, less is known about this critical population of muscle nociceptors. Here, we compare the physiology of individual muscle afferents in uninjured males and females. We then characterize the molecular, physiological, and behavioral effects of transient ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R), a model we have extensively studied in males and in females.
Methods
Response properties and phenotypes to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimulation were compared using an ex vivo muscle/nerve/dorsal root ganglia (DRG)/spinal cord recording preparation. Analyses of injury-related changes were also performed by assaying evoked and spontaneous pain-related behaviors, as well as mRNA expression of the affected muscle and DRGs. The appropriate analyses of variance and post hoc tests (with false discovery rate corrections when needed) were performed for each measure.
Results
Females have more mechanically sensitive muscle afferents and show greater mechanical and thermal responsiveness than what is found in males. With I/R, both sexes show fewer cells responsive to an innocuous metabolite solution (ATP, lactic acid, and protons), and lower mechanical thresholds in individual afferents; however, females also possess altered thermal responsiveness, which may be related to sex-dependent changes in gene expression within the affected DRGs. Regardless, both sexes show similar increases in I/R-induced pain-like behaviors.
Conclusions
Here, we illustrate a unique phenomenon wherein discrete, sex-dependent mechanisms of primary muscle afferent sensitization after ischemic injury to the periphery may underlie similar behavioral changes between the sexes. Furthermore, although the group III and IV muscle afferents are fully developed functionally, the differential mechanisms of sensitization manifest prior to sexual maturity. Hence, this study illustrates the pressing need for further exploration of sex differences in afferent function throughout the lifespan for use in developing appropriately targeted pain therapies.

- Mechanical allodynia & hyperlagesia -
Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury (2018)
Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury
J. Ross, L.F. Queme, J.E. Lamb, K.J. Green, M.P. Jankowski
Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA
Published in "Biology of Sex Differences" (2018-01-03)

Background
Chronic pain conditions are more prevalent in women, but most preclinical studies into mechanisms of pain generation are performed using male animals. Furthermore, whereas group III and IV nociceptive muscle afferents provoke central sensitization more effectively than their cutaneous counterparts, less is known about this critical population of muscle nociceptors. Here, we compare the physiology of individual muscle afferents in uninjured males and females. We then characterize the molecular, physiological, and behavioral effects of transient ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R), a model we have extensively studied in males and in females.
Methods
Response properties and phenotypes to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimulation were compared using an ex vivo muscle/nerve/dorsal root ganglia (DRG)/spinal cord recording preparation. Analyses of injury-related changes were also performed by assaying evoked and spontaneous pain-related behaviors, as well as mRNA expression of the affected muscle and DRGs. The appropriate analyses of variance and post hoc tests (with false discovery rate corrections when needed) were performed for each measure.
Results
Females have more mechanically sensitive muscle afferents and show greater mechanical and thermal responsiveness than what is found in males. With I/R, both sexes show fewer cells responsive to an innocuous metabolite solution (ATP, lactic acid, and protons), and lower mechanical thresholds in individual afferents; however, females also possess altered thermal responsiveness, which may be related to sex-dependent changes in gene expression within the affected DRGs. Regardless, both sexes show similar increases in I/R-induced pain-like behaviors.
Conclusions
Here, we illustrate a unique phenomenon wherein discrete, sex-dependent mechanisms of primary muscle afferent sensitization after ischemic injury to the periphery may underlie similar behavioral changes between the sexes. Furthermore, although the group III and IV muscle afferents are fully developed functionally, the differential mechanisms of sensitization manifest prior to sexual maturity. Hence, this study illustrates the pressing need for further exploration of sex differences in afferent function throughout the lifespan for use in developing appropriately targeted pain therapies.

Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain. (2010)
Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain.
X. Pichon, A. Wattiez, C. Becamel, I. Ehrlich, J. Bockaert, et al.
Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Pharmacologie fondamentale et clinique de la Douleur, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
Published in "Molecular Therapy" (2010-08-08)

Antidepressants are one of the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Despite the influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in pain modulation, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less effective than tricyclic antidepressants. Here, we show, in diabetic neuropathic rats, an alteration of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors, which are known to mediate SSRI-induced analgesia. 5-HT(2A) receptor density was not changed in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, whereas postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), one of the PSD-95/disc large suppressor/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain containing proteins interacting with these receptors, was upregulated. Intrathecal injection of a cell-penetrating peptidyl mimetic of the 5-HT(2A) receptor C-terminus, which disrupts 5-HT(2A) receptor-PDZ protein interactions, induced an antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic rats, which results from activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors by endogenous 5-HT. The peptide also enhanced antihyperalgesia induced by the SSRI fluoxetine. Its effects likely resulted from an increase in receptor responsiveness, because it revealed functional 5-HT(2A) receptor-operated Ca(2+) responses in neurons, an effect mimicked by knockdown of PSD-95. Hence, 5-HT(2A) receptor/PDZ protein interactions might contribute to the resistance to SSRI-induced analgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy. Disruption of these interactions might be a valuable strategy to design novel treatments for neuropathic pain and to increase the effectiveness of SSRIs.

- Neuropathic pain -
Therapeutic benefits of maintaining mitochondrial integrity and calcium homeostasis by forced expression of Hsp27 in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (2019)
Therapeutic benefits of maintaining mitochondrial integrity and calcium homeostasis by forced expression of Hsp27 in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy
VB Chine, NPB Au, CHE Ma
Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Published in "Neurobiology of Disease" (2019-06-06)

Background Vincristine, a widely used antineoplastic agent, is known to be neurotoxic and to lead to chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), which is characterized by nerve damage. Growing evidence suggests that disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis in peripheral neurons contributes largely to the pathological conditions of CIPN. Our previous study showed that forced expression of a peripheral nerve injury-induced small heat shock protein (Hsp), Hsp27, accelerates axon regeneration and functional recovery. In the current study, we examined whether neuronal expression of human Hsp27 (hHsp27) can prevent the inhibitory effects of vincristine in two mouse models of peripheral nerve injury, namely, sciatic nerve crush and CIPN.
Methods The protective effects of hHsp27 against vincristine were examined in mouse models of both sciatic nerve crush and CIPN using multiple approaches, including animal behavioral tests, histology, electrophysiology, transmission electron microscopy and calcium imaging.
Results Vincristine delayed functional recovery in littermate mice; however, hHsp27 Tg mice were unaffected after vincristine treatment and sciatic nerve crush. In CIPN mice, hHsp27 protected against vincristine-induced mechanical and cold allodynia by preventing axonal degeneration, demyelination, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. Strikingly, vincristine-induced calcium influx was markedly attenuated in sensory neurons of hHsp27 Tg mice.
Conclusions. Our findings suggest that preserving myelin and mitochondrial integrity as well as maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis is beneficial for preventing CIPN, and these findings shed new light on the development of anti-CIPN drugs.

Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury (2018)
Sex differences in primary muscle afferent sensitization following ischemia and reperfusion injury
J. Ross, L.F. Queme, J.E. Lamb, K.J. Green, M.P. Jankowski
Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA
Published in "Biology of Sex Differences" (2018-01-03)

Background
Chronic pain conditions are more prevalent in women, but most preclinical studies into mechanisms of pain generation are performed using male animals. Furthermore, whereas group III and IV nociceptive muscle afferents provoke central sensitization more effectively than their cutaneous counterparts, less is known about this critical population of muscle nociceptors. Here, we compare the physiology of individual muscle afferents in uninjured males and females. We then characterize the molecular, physiological, and behavioral effects of transient ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R), a model we have extensively studied in males and in females.
Methods
Response properties and phenotypes to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimulation were compared using an ex vivo muscle/nerve/dorsal root ganglia (DRG)/spinal cord recording preparation. Analyses of injury-related changes were also performed by assaying evoked and spontaneous pain-related behaviors, as well as mRNA expression of the affected muscle and DRGs. The appropriate analyses of variance and post hoc tests (with false discovery rate corrections when needed) were performed for each measure.
Results
Females have more mechanically sensitive muscle afferents and show greater mechanical and thermal responsiveness than what is found in males. With I/R, both sexes show fewer cells responsive to an innocuous metabolite solution (ATP, lactic acid, and protons), and lower mechanical thresholds in individual afferents; however, females also possess altered thermal responsiveness, which may be related to sex-dependent changes in gene expression within the affected DRGs. Regardless, both sexes show similar increases in I/R-induced pain-like behaviors.
Conclusions
Here, we illustrate a unique phenomenon wherein discrete, sex-dependent mechanisms of primary muscle afferent sensitization after ischemic injury to the periphery may underlie similar behavioral changes between the sexes. Furthermore, although the group III and IV muscle afferents are fully developed functionally, the differential mechanisms of sensitization manifest prior to sexual maturity. Hence, this study illustrates the pressing need for further exploration of sex differences in afferent function throughout the lifespan for use in developing appropriately targeted pain therapies.

Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain. (2010)
Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain.
X. Pichon, A. Wattiez, C. Becamel, I. Ehrlich, J. Bockaert, et al.
Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Pharmacologie fondamentale et clinique de la Douleur, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
Published in "Molecular Therapy" (2010-08-08)

Antidepressants are one of the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Despite the influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in pain modulation, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less effective than tricyclic antidepressants. Here, we show, in diabetic neuropathic rats, an alteration of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors, which are known to mediate SSRI-induced analgesia. 5-HT(2A) receptor density was not changed in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, whereas postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), one of the PSD-95/disc large suppressor/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain containing proteins interacting with these receptors, was upregulated. Intrathecal injection of a cell-penetrating peptidyl mimetic of the 5-HT(2A) receptor C-terminus, which disrupts 5-HT(2A) receptor-PDZ protein interactions, induced an antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic rats, which results from activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors by endogenous 5-HT. The peptide also enhanced antihyperalgesia induced by the SSRI fluoxetine. Its effects likely resulted from an increase in receptor responsiveness, because it revealed functional 5-HT(2A) receptor-operated Ca(2+) responses in neurons, an effect mimicked by knockdown of PSD-95. Hence, 5-HT(2A) receptor/PDZ protein interactions might contribute to the resistance to SSRI-induced analgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy. Disruption of these interactions might be a valuable strategy to design novel treatments for neuropathic pain and to increase the effectiveness of SSRIs.



THE INFORMATION IN THIS WEB SITE AND IN LINKED PAGES AND DOCUMENTS IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND DOES NOT CREATE ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY ABOUT BIOSEB OR ITS PRODUCTS OR SERVICES.

Information published on this Web Site as well as services, product specifications, availability and prices are subject to change without notice. BIOSEB may also make improvements and/or changes in the products and/or the programs described in this Web Site at any time without notice.

BIOSEB has made reasonable efforts to verify that the information in this Web site was accurate when first published. Such information may contain errors or omissions, however, and it is subject to change without notice. Bioseb does not undertake to update this information to include any such changes or to correct errors or omissions. Bioseb assumes no responsibility for any use of the information in this Web site or for any infringement of patents or other rights of third parties that may result. Certain information may be country-specific and may not apply in all countries.

Sensor Capacity 0 - 2 kg (20N)
Other capacities on request.
Accuracy 0,1 % of full scale
Resolution 0.1 g
Sampling resolution 1000 Hz
Data Output RS232 for computer, analog output for graphic recorders
Internal memory 100 individual values
Overall dimensions 400x180x200 mm for the Single grip model
and 750 x 180 x 200 mm for the Double grip model
(can be used to measure fore + back limbs ).
Power supply Power adaptor (100-240 V) or battery
Grid and Bars Stainless steel, allowing sterilization, with a specific design to protect the animal paws from injuries, different grids and bars are available depending on the specie and the limbs to be tested.
Example dimensions of the Mouse Grid 100 x 160 mm, angled 30° (other on request).
Special models To measure independently right and left forelimbs, To grip test small monkeys …

Model:
BIO-GS3
Grip strength test
Contact us

Related products:
BIO-CIS
Bioseb CIS Software
Contact us
MMG-XS
Armour Touch Metal Mesh Glove
1 glove - X-Small 7 Contact us
Print version

Bioseb - In Vivo Research Instruments
Phone worldwide : +33 442 344 360 - USA/Canada : (727) 521-1808
e-Mail :