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TREADMILL
(Model: LE8710MTS - 5 lanes for mice, with shock. SeDaCom Software included)
These small animal treadmills are used for forced exercise training and accurate testing of fatigue in rodents. The control unit now comes with touchscreen user interface.

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INSERM GENOPOLE EVRY (France)
INSERM NEUREVA MONTPELLIER (France)
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INSERM MEDICAL SCHOOL ROUEN
CNRS DIJON
CNRS MARSEILLE
MEDICAL SCHOOL STRASBOURG
ICS ILKIRCH
INSERM PHARMACY SCHOOL ILKIRCH
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! NEW RESEARCH WORK ! A recent publication by M Lachaux, M Souli in "Endochrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism" highlights the merits of using Bioseb's Treadmill: Short_and long_term administration of imeglimin counters cardiorenal dysfunction in a rat model of metabolic syndrome

Short_and long_term administration of imeglimin counters cardiorenal dysfunction in a rat model of metabolic syndrome
M Lachaux, M Souli
INSERM U1096, UFR de Sant
Published in "Endochrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism" (2020-04-16)


IntroductionImeglimin, a glucose_lowering agent targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics, decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and improves glucose homeostasis. We investigated whether this is associated with protective effects on metabolic syndrome_related left ventricular (LV) and vascular dysfunctions.
Methods We used Zucker fa/fa rats to assess the effects on LV function, LV tissue perfusion, LV oxidative stress and vascular function induced by imeglimin administered orally for 9 or 90 days at a dose of 150 mg/kg twice daily.
Results Compared to untreated animals, 9_ and 90_day imeglimin treatment decreased LV end_diastolic pressure and LV end_diastolic pressure_volume relation, increased LV tissue perfusion and decreased LV ROS production. Simultaneously, imeglimin restored acetylcholine_mediated coronary relaxation and mesenteric flow_mediated dilation. One hour after imeglimin administration, when glucose plasma levels were not yet modified, imeglimin reduced LV mitochondrial ROS production and improved LV function. Ninety_day imeglimin treatment reduced related LV and kidney fibrosis and improved kidney function.
Conclusion In a rat model, mimicking Human metabolic syndrome, imeglimin immediately countered metabolic syndrome_related cardiac diastolic and vascular dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress/increased NO bioavailability and improving myocardial perfusion and after 90_day treatment myocardial and kidney structure, effects that are, at least in part, independent from glucose control.
Presentation

BIOSEB Treadmills are rolling belts with an adjustable speed and slope, enabling forced exercise training and accurate testing of fatigue in rodents.

Basically, BIOSEB Treadmill apparatus consists of a rolling belt with adjustable speed (up to 150 cm/s) and slope (from -25 to 25 degrees) and a control Unit. The rolling belt is built with especially selected materials to guarantee the best performance under conditions of intensive use and the minimum operations of maintenance, as well as simplicity in keeping it clean. The lanes (corridors of activity for the animal) have sufficient width for the subject to correct its errors in coordination, thereby allowing an exact measurement of the fatigue without deficiencies in motor coordination.

Bioseb's treadmill for rat/mouse: Treadmill Control Unit
Treadmill control unit
Now with a touchscreen interface!
Different models are available depending on the user’s needs:
from one to five lanes, for mice, for rats or for rabbits
Operating principle

The unit controls the speed of the belt, shows measured data in its display, provides current to the shocking grid and allows communication with the PC for data storage, via the RS232 output and SeDaCom software (not included). The new SEDACOM 2.0 version provides an easy and convenient way to visualize and export the data on a computer for further analysis. Belt velocity can also be controlled by the software. Parameters measured in a trial are: belt speed and slope, distance travelled, shock time, and shock intensity.

The electrical shock supplied by the grid is of constant intensity (from 0 to 2 mA), that is, the current which circulates through the animal (and therefore its effect) only depends on the value of the mA chosen and not of the subject (quantity of body mass in contact with the bars, perspiration, etc.).

An air-puff accessory option (air source not included) is interchangeable with shock, enabling the use of one or the other depending on experimental needs.

The brand new control unit’s touchscreen allows control of the speed of the belt and the intensity of the stimulus.

Key features

• Rolling belts with adjustable speed and slope
• Positive and negative slope (-25 to +25 degrees)
• Minimum maintenance required
• Easy to clean
• High performance motor
• Silent operation, even at high regimes
• Accurate control of the intensity of the shock delivered
• Optional air puff solution to replace the electrical shocks

Options

• LE7000 Thermal Printer
SEDACOM software
• RS232/USB adapter for USB communication (for SEDACOM)


Special model upon request: Please enquire
Domains of application

• Improvement of sportive human performances
• Respiratory metabolism
• Oxidative stress
• Diabetes
• Parkinson
• Ischemia
• Osteopenia/osteoporosis



Publications (Click on an article to show details and read the abstract)

MOTOR CONTROL
- Locomotion -
Association between arthritis score at the onset of the disease and long-term locomotor outcome in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats (2015)
Association between arthritis score at the onset of the disease and long-term locomotor outcome in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats
Mossiat C, Laroche D, Prati C, Pozzo T, Demougeot C, Marie C
INSERM U1093, University Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France.
Published in "Arthritis Res Ther." (2015-07-17)

INTRODUCTION:
To investigate the connection between the intensity of initial symptoms of inflammation and locomotor outcome in rheumatoid arthritis, we examined the relationship between long-term locomotor abnormalities and signs of inflammation at the onset of the disease in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rats.

METHODS:
The arthritis score and hind-paw diameter were followed from immunization to day 195 (~7 months). At this time, locomotion was recorded during forced treadmill walking using 3D motion technology before radiographic scoring of hind limb joint damage. Many locomotor parameters were analyzed including time and length parameters, limbs kinematics, lateral paw position at toe off, maximal hind-paw elevation and posture. Ankle mobility was assessed from range of motion (ROM) of the joint during locomotion. Experiments were run in AIA (n = 18) and age-matched non-AIA rats (n = 8).

RESULTS:
All AIA rats exhibited signs of inflammation at day 14 with a peak of inflammatory symptoms at day 22 post-immunization. After the first episode of inflammation, 83 % of AIA rats demonstrated recurrent disease (from week 6 to week 23). The frequency of inflammatory episodes (1 to 5) was not linked to the arthritis score at day 22. At day 195 post-immunization, AIA rats showed significantly impaired locomotion and radiographic lesions as compared to control rats. Significant relationships were observed between most locomotion-related parameters and concurrent ROM of ankle, which correlated negatively with the radiographic score. ROM of ankle at day 195 correlated negatively with both the arthritis score and hind-paw diameter measured at day 14, 22 and 30 post-immunization.

CONCLUSION:
Decreased ankle mobility can be considered a driver of locomotion impairment in AIA. In this model, the severity of the initial inflammatory symptoms had a good prognostic value for long-term locomotor outcome.

Kinematics of obstacle clearance in the rat. (2011)
Kinematics of obstacle clearance in the rat.
O. Perrot, D. Laroche, T. Pozzo, C. Marie.
INSERM, U887, Motricité-Plasticité, Dijon, France.
Published in "Behavioural Brain Research" (2011-10-31)

Although the rat has become the favourite animal model in preclinical research on locomotion, studies designed to assess the strategy used by rats to avoid obstacle are lacking. Using an optoelectronic 3D motion analysis system, we therefore, compared the step pattern, timing and length variables of locomotor cycles, trajectories and joint angles of limbs when rats step between and over obstacles (3 cm-high) fixed on a treadmill belt (25 cm/s). Motion in all four limbs of adult animals with an initial age of 11 weeks was serially recorded for a period of 10 weeks. The results showed that obstacle clearance is associated with the reorganization of the basic step pattern resulting in increased stride length of all limbs, increased duration of the swing phase of the hindlimbs only, and the appearance of two quadrupedal stance phases. They also revealed that the elevation of limbs above the obstacle not only involves flexion but also displacement of the corresponding girdles. Remarkably, the trajectory of the trailing forelimb to get over the obstacle is almost a mirror image of the trajectory of the leading forelimb. Lastly, all of the parameters measured remained stable over the observation period during which body weight gain reached 100g (one third of the initial body weight). In conclusion, our study may provide a basis for future studies aimed at understanding the neural pathways involved in pathologies associated with deficit/recovery of challenged locomotion in rats.

MUSCULAR SYSTEM
- General muscular system -
The Ca2+ influx through the mammalian skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is irrelevant for muscle performance (2017)
The Ca2+ influx through the mammalian skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is irrelevant for muscle performance
A Dayal, K Schrötter, Y Pan, K Föhr, W Melzer, M Grabner
Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria
Published in "Nature Communications" (2017-09-07)

Skeletal muscle excitation?contraction (EC) coupling is initiated by sarcolemmal depolarization, which is translated into a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), which in turn activates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release to trigger muscle contraction. During EC coupling, the mammalian DHPR embraces functional duality, as voltage sensor and l-type Ca2+ channel. Although its unique role as voltage sensor for conformational EC coupling is firmly established, the conventional function as Ca2+ channel is still enigmatic. Here we show that Ca2+ influx via DHPR is not necessary for muscle performance by generating a knock-in mouse where DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx is eliminated. Homozygous knock-in mice display SR Ca2+ release, locomotor activity, motor coordination, muscle strength and susceptibility to fatigue comparable to wild-type controls, without any compensatory regulation of multiple key proteins of the EC coupling machinery and Ca2+ homeostasis. These findings support the hypothesis that the DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx in mammalian skeletal muscle is an evolutionary remnant.

- Skeletal functions -
The Ca2+ influx through the mammalian skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is irrelevant for muscle performance (2017)
The Ca2+ influx through the mammalian skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is irrelevant for muscle performance
A Dayal, K Schrötter, Y Pan, K Föhr, W Melzer, M Grabner
Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria
Published in "Nature Communications" (2017-09-07)

Skeletal muscle excitation?contraction (EC) coupling is initiated by sarcolemmal depolarization, which is translated into a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), which in turn activates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release to trigger muscle contraction. During EC coupling, the mammalian DHPR embraces functional duality, as voltage sensor and l-type Ca2+ channel. Although its unique role as voltage sensor for conformational EC coupling is firmly established, the conventional function as Ca2+ channel is still enigmatic. Here we show that Ca2+ influx via DHPR is not necessary for muscle performance by generating a knock-in mouse where DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx is eliminated. Homozygous knock-in mice display SR Ca2+ release, locomotor activity, motor coordination, muscle strength and susceptibility to fatigue comparable to wild-type controls, without any compensatory regulation of multiple key proteins of the EC coupling machinery and Ca2+ homeostasis. These findings support the hypothesis that the DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx in mammalian skeletal muscle is an evolutionary remnant.

Mitochondria of trained skeletal muscle are protected from deleterious effects of statins. (2012)
Mitochondria of trained skeletal muscle are protected from deleterious effects of statins.
J. Bouitbir, F. Daussin, A.-L. Charles, L. Rasseneur, S. Dufour et al.
CHRU of Strasbourg, Physiology and Functional Explorations Department, Strasbourg, France
Published in "Muscle and Nerve" (2012-01-13)

Introduction: Statins are associated with adverse skeletal muscle effects. Our objective was to determine if muscular adaptations following exercise training prevented deleterious effects of atorvastatin in glycolytic skeletal muscle. Methods: 20 rats were divided into 2 groups: a control group (n=10; Cont) and a 10 days of training group (n=10; Training). Using the permeabilized fibers technique, we explored mitochondrial function. Results: Exercise training increased Vmax and H2O2 production without altering the free radical leak, and mRNA expression of SOD2 and Cox1 were higher in trained muscle. In the Cont group, atorvastatin exposure increased H2O2 production and decreased skeletal muscle Vmax. The decreased Vmax effect of atorvastatin was dose dependent. Interestingly, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was higher in the Training group. H2O2 production increased in trained muscle after atorvastatin exposure. Conclusions: These results suggest that improvements in mitochondrial respiratory and antioxidant capacities following endurance training protected them against statin exposure.

- Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) -
Unlike Physical Exercise, Modified Environment Increases the Lifespan of SOD1G93A Mice However Both Conditions Induce Cellular Changes (2012)
Unlike Physical Exercise, Modified Environment Increases the Lifespan of SOD1G93A Mice However Both Conditions Induce Cellular Changes
Yannick N. Gerber, Jean-Charles Sabourin, Jean-Philippe Hugnot, Florence E. Perrin
INSERM, Montpellier, France / Neuroscience Department, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao, Spain
Published in "PLOS ONE" (2012-09-20)

Background

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by a gradual muscular paralysis resulting from progressive motoneurons death. ALS etiology remains unknown although it has been demonstrated to be a multifactorial disease involving several cellular partners. There is currently no effective treatment. Even if the effect of exercise is under investigation for many years, whether physical exercise is beneficial or harmful is still under debate.

Methods and Findings

We investigated the effect of three different intensities of running exercises on the survival of SOD1G93A mice. At the early-symptomatic stage (P60), males were isolated and randomly assigned to 5 conditions: 2 sedentary groups (“sedentary” and “sedentary treadmill” placed on the inert treadmill), and 3 different training intensity groups (5 cm/s, 10 cm/s and 21 cm/s; 15 min/day, 5days/week). We first demonstrated that an appropriate “control” of the environment is of the utmost importance since comparison of the two sedentary groups evidenced an 11.6% increase in survival in the “sedentary treadmill” group. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry that this increased lifespan is accompanied with motoneurons survival and increased glial reactivity in the spinal cord. In a second step, we showed that when compared with the proper control, all three running-based training did not modify lifespan of the animals, but result in motoneurons preservation and changes in glial cells activation.

Conclusions/Significance

We demonstrate that increase in survival induced by a slight daily modification of the environment is associated with motoneurons preservation and strong glial modifications in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A. Using the appropriate control, we then demonstrate that all running intensities have no effect on the survival of ALS mice but induce cellular modifications. Our results highlight the critical importance of the control of the environment in ALS studies and may explain discrepancy in the literature regarding the effect of exercise in ALS.



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Current Range adjustable from 0 to 2 mA
Belt Speed adjustable from 0 to 150cms/sec
Running Surface 450 mm long x 100 mm wide
Running Lanes 1, 2, or 5, depending upon model selected
Shock Grid 190 mm long x 100 mm wide
Slope adjustable from -25° to 25°
Maximum number of stations 1 per computer with SeDaCom.
Certifications CE Compliant
Power Requirements 110V or 220V, 50/60Hz

Model:
LE8710MTS
Treadmill
5 lanes for mice, with shock. SeDaCom Software included Contact us

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Accessories :
replacing Running-belt replacing motor belt
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