Inflammation-induced decrease in voluntary wheel running in mice- a nonreflexive test for evaluating inflammatory pain and analgesia-
Send a publication request
close

Publication request

Thank you for your interest in our product range and your request for this publication, which will be sent to you if the research team and the journal allow it. Our commercial team will contact you as soon as possible.



- Categories : Inflammatory pain , Pain , Publications

Authors
E. Cobos, N. Ghasemlou, D. Araldi, D. Segal, K. Duong et al.


Lab
Children's Hospital Boston, F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston, USA.

Journal
Pain

Abstract
Inflammatory pain impacts adversely on the quality of life of patients, often resulting in motor disabilities. Therefore, we studied the effect of peripheral inflammation induced by intraplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in mice on a particular form of voluntary locomotion, wheel running, as an index of mobility impairment produced by pain. The distance traveled over 1 hour of free access to activity wheels decreased significantly in response to hind paw inflammation, peaking 24 hours after CFA administration. Recovery of voluntary wheel running by day 3 correlated with the ability to support weight on the inflamed limb. Inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, measured with von Frey hairs, lasted considerably longer than the impaired voluntary wheel running and is not driving; therefore, the change in voluntary behavior. The CFA-induced decrease in voluntary wheel running was dose-dependently reversed by subcutaneous administration of antiinflammatory and analgesic drugs, including naproxen (10-80 mg/kg), ibuprofen (2.5-20mg/kg), diclofenac (1.25-10mg/kg), celecoxib (2.5-20mg/kg), prednisolone (0.62-5mg/kg), and morphine (0.06-0.5mg/kg), all at much lower doses than reported in most rodent models. Furthermore, the doses that induced recovery in voluntary wheel running did not reduce CFA-induced mechanical allodynia, indicating a greater sensitivity of the former as a surrogate measure of inflammatory pain. We conclude that monitoring changes in voluntary wheel running in mice during peripheral inflammation is a simple, observer-independent objective measure of functional changes produced by inflammation, likely more aligned to the global level of pain than reflexive measures, and much more sensitive to analgesic drug effects.

BIOSEB Instruments Used:
Spontaneous activity wheels (BIO-ACTIVW-M),Plethysmometer (BX-PLETHY),Dynamic Weight Bearing 2.0 (BIO-DWB-DUAL)

Share this content