Reduction of Neuropathic and Inflammatory Pain through Inhibition of the Tetrahydrobiopterin Pathway
Send a publication request
close

Publication request

Thank you for your interest in our product range and your request for this publication, which will be sent to you if the research team and the journal allow it. Our commercial team will contact you as soon as possible.



Authors
Latremoliere A, Latini A, Andrews N, Cronin SJ et al.


Lab
Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Journal
Neuron.

Abstract
Human genetic studies have revealed an association between GTP cyclohydrolase 1 polymorphisms, which decrease tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels, and reduced pain in patients. We now show that excessive BH4 is produced in mice by both axotomized sensory neurons and macrophages infiltrating damaged nerves and inflamed tissue. Constitutive BH4 overproduction in sensory neurons increases pain sensitivity, whereas blocking BH4 production only in these cells reduces nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity without affecting nociceptive pain. To minimize risk of side effects, we targeted sepiapterin reductase (SPR), whose blockade allows minimal BH4 production through the BH4 salvage pathways. Using a structure-based design, we developed a potent SPR inhibitor and show that it reduces pain hypersensitivity effectively with a concomitant decrease in BH4 levels in target tissues, acting both on sensory neurons and macrophages, with no development of tolerance or adverse effects. Finally, we demonstrate that sepiapterin accumulation is a sensitive biomarker for SPR inhibition in vivo.

BIOSEB Instruments Used:
Dynamic Weight Bearing 2.0 (BIO-DWB-DUAL)

Share this content